Nate’s Player Cheat Sheet

Nate’s D&D 5e Player Cheat Sheet PDF Download

What is Combat?

  • What is a round? A round of combat begins when two or more creatures engage in direct confrontation. Combat begins at the discretion of the DM.

  • How long is a round? A typical round of combat lasts 4-6 seconds. When in combat you are unable to have long conversations with friends or foes.

  • How are turns decided? At the beginning of combat, every player and creature rolls for initiative + their initiative bonus. The higher your Initiative score, the sooner your turn is placed in the order.

 

Things besides attacking that you can do in combat:

 

  • Dash: Move twice your normal movement distance without attacking.

  • Move & Attack: You can move your normal movement distance and attack including moving x feet, attack, then move the remaining feet available to your character based on maximum distance.

  • Disengage: Prevent attacks of opportunity on yourself.

  • Dodge: Attack roles on you until your next turn are rolled with disadvantage if you can see the attacker and you make dexterity saving throws with advantage.

  • Help: Ability checks and attack rolls of allies within 5 feet of you are made with advantage.

  • Hide: You hide and roll a dexterity save check against the passive perception of any enemies within LOS of your position with due consideration for cover and concealment.

  • Ready: You ready yourself for an action based on a described circumstance. Your reaction can then be executed at any point during combat, including outside of your turn or during your next turn. You are then able to take a normal action in addition to the reaction.

  • Search: You use your Wisdom (perception) or Intelligence (Investigation) check to examine your surrounds.

  • Use an object: For example, throw a torch, light a torch, throw a rock, tie a knot, untie a knot, etc.

  • Anything! This is a roleplaying game, the goal is to place yourself in your characters shoes and think out your actions and what your character would do.

 

Attacking:

Melee Attacks

  1. Choose a target within the reach of your weapon (typically 5 feet or 1 hex or square) that you have LOS (line of sight) too.

  2. Determine Modifiers to the Attack Roll (next step):

    1. Advantage / Disadvantage (i.e cover, status, etc)

    2. Protective spells, equipment, or conditions

    3. Hindering spells, equipment, or conditions

  3. Make an Attack Roll. This is used to determine if you actually hit the enemy.

    1. Add your Attack Roll with your Ability Modifier (STR or DEX) and Proficiency Bonus (+2 at level 1) to get your attack value.

    2. If your attack value is greater or equal to the AC (Armor Class) of the enemy, you hit.

  4. If you hit the enemy, make a Damage Roll. This is the type of dice and number of dice based on your weapon.

    1. Add your Damage Roll with your Ability Modifier (STR or DEX).

    2. Note: Do NOT add your Proficiency Bonus

  5. Subtract the number of damage points from the enemy Hit Points.

Ranged Non-Spell Attacks

  1. Choose a target within the reach of your weapon that you have LOS (line of sight) too.

  2. Determine Modifiers to the Attack Roll (next step):

    1. Advantage / Disadvantage (i.e cover, status, etc)

      1. When attacking with a ranged weapon at an enemy within 5 feet, you have Disadvantage on your Attack Roll.

    2. Protective spells, equipment, or conditions

    3. Hindering spells, equipment, or conditions

  3. Make an Attack Roll. This is used to determine if you actually hit the enemy.

    1. Add your Attack Roll with your Ability Modifier (DEX for all ranged weapons) and Proficiency Bonus (+2 at level 1) to get your attack value.

    2. If your attack value is greater or equal to the AC (Armor Class) of the enemy, you hit.

  4. If you hit the enemy, make a Damage Roll. This is the type of dice and number of dice based on your weapon.

    1. Add your Damage Roll with your Ability Modifier (DEX for all ranged weapons).

    2. Note: Do NOT add your Proficiency Bonus

    3. Note: Some ranged weapons require two damage rolls in order to determine a normal range and a long range depending on distance to target.

  5. Subtract the number of damage points from the enemy Hit Points.

 

Spellcasting Attacks

Basics

  • Two types of magic: Spells and Cantrips

    • Spells can be Level 1 to 9.

    • Cantrips are Level 0 spells.

  • Spells:

    • Spells must be firmly fixed in the mind, known as prepared. The process of preparing a Spell is slightly different per class and can range from simply affixing the Spell during a long rest, or going through a process to prepare the Spell. The number of Spells you can have prepared varies depending on your class and level. The number and type of Spells you know is based on your class, level, and agreed on rules.

    • You cannot cast Spells in armor that you are not proficient with.

    • Spell Slots are the number of uses of a spell level that you are allowed. This is separate from the spells known and prepared (you can know many spells, but only have X (based on class and level) prepared.

      • When you use a Level 1 Spell, you must have a Level 1 Spell Slot available.

      • When you use a Spell in a Spell Slot, the Spell Slot is considered filled and unavailable until your character has had a long rest.

      • A Level 1 Spell can be used in a Level 9 Slot, and may even scale depending on the Spell, however, a Level 9 Spell cannot be used in a Level 1 Spell Slot.

  • Cantrips:

    • Cantrips are Spells that can be cost at will, without using a Spell Slot (described below). These Spells do not require preparation. They also do not require a long rest to recharge, but can be used from round to round of combat, and in some cases as bonus actions in addition to regular actions.

Casting Spells

  • Casting Time

    • Spells can be a bonus action, a reaction, an action, and even longer ranging from minutes to hours.

    • Spells cast in minutes to hours require concentration, which cannot be broken or the cast fails and you must try again.

  • Range

    • Varies from Spell to Spell and can be as short as melee range (5 ft) or occurring across vast distances and planes.

  • Components

    • (V) Verbal – requires you to be able to speak the spell.

    • (S) Somatic – requires you to be able to make a hand signal with at least one free hand.

    • (M) Material – A component pouch or spellcasting focus can be used in place of a material unless a material is specifically consumed by the spell.

Targeting Spells

  • Requirements

    • A clear path to the target. The target cannot be behind total cover.

  • You can target yourself with both direct and area-of-effect spells unless the spell specifically states that it must be targeted at an enemy.

  • Creatures do not specifically know if they are being targeted by a Spell, unless there are obvious signs, for example sustained eye contact, pointing (longer than an action), or some other type of visual effect that typically only occurs after the spell was cast.

Attacking a Target

  • Harmful Spells will state whether you need to make an Attack Roll (same process as Melee and Ranged (non-spell) attacks), or if the target will need to make a Spell Save DC Roll (DC = Difficulty Class). Magic Missiles are the only spell that does not require an Attack Roll or a Spell Save DC roll, as they always hit, unless the target is invulnerable to force damage by some innate trait or shield.

  • The Process for Attacking with a Spell:

    • Choose a target within the reach of your Spell that you have LOS (line of sight) too.

    • For Spells that require an Attack Roll:

      • Determine Modifiers to the Attack Roll (next step):

        • Advantage / Disadvantage (i.e cover, status, etc)

          • When attacking with a ranged weapon at an enemy within 5 feet, you have Disadvantage on your Attack Roll.

        • Protective spells, equipment, or conditions

        • Hindering spells, equipment, or conditions

      • Make an Attack Roll. This is used to determine if you actually hit the enemy.

        • Add your Attack Roll with your Ability Modifier (CHA, INT, WIS) and Proficiency Bonus (+2 at level 1) to get your attack value.

        • If your attack value is greater or equal to the AC (Armor Class) of the enemy, you hit.

    • For Spells that require a Spell Save DC Roll:

      • The Spell dictates which ability modifier the enemy must use in addition to a D20 roll, which is then compared against your Spell Save DC (Difficulty Class).

      • The SSDC is 8 + your spellcasting ability modifier + your proficiency.

      • If the Spell Save DC Roll is less than your SSDC value, your spell hits.

    • If you hit the enemy, make a Damage Roll. This is the type of dice and number of dice based on the Spell.

      • Note: Do NOT add your Ability Modifier unless the Spell explicitly says to.

      • Note: Do NOT add your Proficiency Bonus

    • Subtract the number of damage points from the enemy Hit Points.

 

General Combat Information

Resistance, Vulnerability, and Damage Types

There are several types of damage, which by themselves do not have separate rules, but can be described differently in their effect. The true purpose of Damage Types is in their application for characters and creatures resistances and vulnerabilities.

A creature or character that is vulnerable to a certain type of damage always takes double damage from that type.

A creature or character that is resistant to a certain type of damage always takes half damage from that type.

Critical Hits

A critical hit occurs when a player rolls a natural 20 on his or her Attack Roll. This means that the d20 = 20 without modifiers.

A critical hit allows you to roll all dice involved in the attack twice, add the combined damage, then any modifiers (ability + proficiency for weapon attacks) to the total damage done.

Healing

In combat, healing occurs only via spells or medicine taken. The amount of healing done cannot exceed the total number of hit points a character has.

Outside of combat, a short rest of no less than 1 hour allows you to use your Hit Dice, the type of dice is defined by your class, and the number of dice is defined by your level, to recover Hit Points. The Hit Dice are rolled and the result is added in Hit Points to your current total. The Hit Dice is then considered expired until after a long rest.

Outside of combat, a long rest of no less than 8 hours consisting of at least 6 hours of rest, no more than 2 hours of light activity, and no more than 1 hour of strenuous activity, heals all Hit Points and restores all Hit Dice.

Incapacitation and Death

Instant Death occurs if an attack reduces you to 0 hit points, and the remaining damage exceeds your Hit Point Maximum.

Incapacitation occurs if your are reduced to 0 hit points and not instantly killed. When you are incapacitated you must make Death Saving Throws each round of combat you are incapacitated. You make Death Saving Throws until you are stabilized via medicine, or healed (provided Hit Points). For each Death Saving Throw, you roll a d20. If the result is less than 10, you fail, if the result is 10 or greater, you succeed. 3 failed throws (regardless of order) results in death. 3 successful throws regains 1 HP.

Rolling a 1 on your d20 Death Saving Throw results in 2 failures. Rolling a 20 regains 1 HP.

Upon gaining 1 HP, you are no longer incapacitated and can move on your own again.

Stabilization

An incapacitated character can be stabilized by a helpful character or NPC by making a Medicine (WIS) Ability Check at the side of the incapacitated character. A stabilized creature makes no Death Saving Throws but their HP remain at 0. They remain stable until they are attacked again or regain 1  HP.

 

 

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Author: Nate O'Brien